Seeing a Notary

If you have the need to see a notary, The Society provides these hints:

  1. DO NOT EXPECT TO SEE A NOTARY WITHOUT FIRST MAKING AN APPOINTMENT;
  2. You will need to bring good evidence of identity eg. a current and valid Passport or Driver's Licence that will confirm your current address;
  3. The notary may be able to give you over the telephone an idea of the fee to be charged, but until the notary sees the document/s and matter in hand, it is often not possible to quote accurately;
  4. If the document is not in English you need to establish whether the notary might require a translation be obtained first;
  5. The notary will need to be satisfied that you understand the document you are signing - if you do not understand the contents, you may need legal advice, either obtained first before the visit, or ask the notary to provide this.
  6. Take with you to show the notary the instructions you may have received from overseas so that the notary can try to ensure that your requirements for overseas are satisfied at the FIRST visit;
  7. If you are able to send a copy of the required document to the notary before your visit this will save time and probably expense.

The Society's Recommended Fee Scale is set out on the site. Often, a multitude of small tasks may be required to be done by the notary and therefore you can expect to be charged based on his professional time engaged.

Until the notary is able to view the documentation involved, it may be difficult for the notary to assess the time of the notary's attendance. Generally, for a straight forward document you could expect the notary to see you for about 15 minutes and then conclude the notary's involvement within a further 10 minutes.

If the documentation is not so straight forward, it will take longer.

Notaries are sometimes available to travel out of their office or attend out of hours. You would need to make arrangements for these attendances and expect to pay additional fees.